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[Sticky] Health, Nutrition, organs?  

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Captain Mainwaring
(@captain-mainwaring)
Noble Member

FB - thanks for that post. Very enlightening that as a serious sportsman your main advice for normal people wanting to be reasonably fit is just to have a good balanced diet. Personally I don't like the idea of special diets or taking supplements.

So a question. Did your nutritionist talk about metabolic typing at all? There is a theory that different people have different needs in terms of the balance between carbs, protein and fat and that you need to get the balance right in order to maximise the benefit of what you eat

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Posted : 27/01/2015 9:53 pm
Kai
 Kai
(@kai)
Noble Member

Interesting. I also subscribe to eating normally. Not that anyone should be listening to my 'advice' on this subject.

I'm interested in what you mean by:

more specific/explosive training

Not least as I am unable to do as much MTBing just now following hand surgery. So I'm doing more turbo time than before. Mostly interval stuff. But it feels like I'm getting stronger when I'm out on a 'proper' bike even though I'm doing fewer hours training a week.

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Posted : 28/01/2015 12:58 pm
forkbrayker
(@forkbrayker)
Reputable Member

for the captain. regarding metabolic rates, he didn't really cover it other than the basic fact of "i have a lot of muscle and therefore my metabolism will be higher than if i didn't". he also said that his qualifications from uni are several years past and he only wanted to concentrate on the tried and tested methods at a generic level, with metabolic typing requiring more equipment from uni which he doesn't have access too. Basically lets go "tried and tested" to avoid any fukkups seeing as this is my first year going real serious. I was also stuck regarding personal trainers in this neck of the woods as most are self taught wannabes and all advertise "motivation" which i certainly don't need and a lot pandering to the "herbalshite" brigade, with this guy being the only one to talk about performance improvement on their website coupled with uni qualifications. so whilst i'm sure he's not the best/most progressive in Britain i don't think he's talking out of his ass either.

for kai. basically what he's got me doing is a change from the same drills i did day in day out for the past year with slight progression - with my cardio gym day lasting 1hour, and resistance day lasting an 1 hour, swapping day about... but i was also riding up to 3 hrs on gym days and running in the morning + labouring at work.....hence the 3000cal a day just to keep going. all i've acheived is a relatively high level of fitness with a special dispensity to torture my self. and no real performance gains

so.. going for quality over quantity was his answer. he gave me 6 tabatta style drills, comprising of bodyweight excercise, rowing machine, turbo trainer, and sprinting, with each drill session lasting about 15 -25 mins in total. to begin with it was diet (lost 4kg in 3 weeks) then the easier tabatta drills, then the harder tabatta drills, then stacking of tabatta drills, never in the same order usually 2 back to back although i have had one that was 3 back to back (jeez that one was beyond brutal!!!)
the key behind the drills is timing the work periods and timing the rest periods and ABOVE ALL going full tilt during the work periods. his goal being to get my V02 higher, and to massively improve my lactic thresholds, not just in the legs but in whole body due to mountainbiking being a whole body workout. (anyone experience rubber arms whilst sprinting up a climb??? coz i certainly do!) so in theory my body is constantly getting shocked and won't adapt to anything in particular just lactic acid resistance. For the biking side of things he's said that's up to me as he is not an expert in that side of things and that will be up to me how i train whilst on the bike.
going back to the diet side of things, i don't eat much carbs now, but the carbs i do eat are porridge in the morning when i first wake, banana at 10 am, energy drink 20 mins before gym, rice/sweet potatao/whole pasta for lunch
and same again at night..... so basically minimal carbs for during day to help burn fat and maintain necessary body functions, and then a hit before and after training for glycogen stores and not to continually train the same systems several times during the day + plus adequate recovery periods between sessions. and for those that don't know carb loading does not mean eating a big bowl of pasta the night before a race. at its most basic it means glycogen depletion for three days (bastard!!!!) then carb overload for three days ( woop woop) then race. I won't give details of food amounts as that's dependent on body type, body size, metabolism, work routine, desired effects on body etc . hence why if you are serious about that last few % you must go to a nutritionist for advise tailored for you.

for the facts on my improvement... the turbo trainer drill i am doing is 60secs full bore sprint, 75secs easy spin 12 times over.
when i first did this 6 weeks ago, i thought i could sprint..... but found I could only last 20 secs before legs started to lock on me, now i can now go the full minute for the first 4 blasts, and 50 secs for the rest, basically 120% improvement in 4 weeks!!!!. and finally out in the real world of mountainbiking, i have never ever felt so strong in climbs and sprints - ever!!! and on that basis, something is definitely working. unfortunately i have to wait till first race in march to see if its all bullshit or not lol
if yer really interested Kai, PM me and i will do my best to break down the drills he's given me, for you to try. hope your wrist heals quick

sorry guys hope that's not been too much trumpeting and boring info.....but you did ask!!

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Posted : 28/01/2015 6:40 pm
Obi
 Obi
(@obi)
Estimable Member

Thanks Forkbrayker, I find it incredibly interesting. If you are willing, I would be grateful for sight of the drills too.

It's not rocket science really - eat clean, in proportion and base your training on what you want your body to do, but vary it up. I do a bit of running, fartlek training is a good example of how interval sprinting helps you run long distances faster within the context of a balanced training program.

Regardless, nutrition is key - no matter what you do, you can't out-train a bad diet. Although poor self discipline in all sorts of ways means I am constantly trying to...

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Posted : 28/01/2015 11:18 pm
Captain Mainwaring
(@captain-mainwaring)
Noble Member

Yeah, also thanks. Quite enlightening.

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Posted : 28/01/2015 11:48 pm
forkbrayker
(@forkbrayker)
Reputable Member

yeah no problem Obi, will PM you in evening when i finish work.

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Posted : 29/01/2015 9:14 am
Kai
 Kai
(@kai)
Noble Member

That's very useful and suggests that my thinking is on the right lines.

I just need to give it the 100% on the flat out bits of my turbo sessions. I certainly know that I am putting in more effort this season on the turbo than before. But that's partly down to having replaced my 17 year old turbo with a nice smooth one that doesn't cause muscle strains!

Given my age and modest ambitions I think I have enough to go on. So I won't need to be scared by seeing the detailed drills.

Thanks for sharing this.

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Posted : 29/01/2015 10:08 am
Gimpy
(@gimpy)
Estimable Member

It may have already been posted but i found the my fitness pal app quite good for watching daily intake.

I lost a power of weight a few years ago and found moderation was far easier than all this diet jazz. Now i try to eat as much veg as i can plenty tuna fruit n the usual common sense foods.
I tend to strugle when im dayshift with water consumption but on nightshift im like a fish.

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Posted : 29/01/2015 4:42 pm
forkbrayker
(@forkbrayker)
Reputable Member

tru dat gimpy. and indeed i have adjusted my diet slightly so i enjoy it and therefore far more likely to sustain it. and am still noticing the benefit through moderation instead of starvation lol. I work shifts too and it can be quite bothersome trying to adhere to things like water consumption and food times, but attempting is far better than not at all

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Posted : 29/01/2015 6:38 pm
roberthood
(@roberthood)
New Member

In fact, healthy nutrition is an important factor for us to be strong! It is rather important to eat foods that don't contain harmful ingredients, such as genetically modified foods - be careful and read attentively all the components containing in your foods:  

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Posted : 16/12/2016 8:31 am
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