Has the bike press ...
 

Has the bike press and Enduro scene made us "over biked"?  

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Mikeep
(@mikeep)
New Member

I think the 160mm enduro bike certainly has its place and for me that's in an enduro race especially, as Trauty has mentioned, manufacturers are releasing bikes with aggressive geometry and less travel. The 160mm travel and slack geo allows you to tackle steep/gnarly stuff and high speeds.

I demo'd a 5010 v2 recently and was amazed how capable a bike it was but at the same time, was great fun on less gnarly trails/red routes. It seams to be the goldilocks formula at the moment and I feel it works very well. You can still ride steep and gnarly terrain, just not at the same pace as the more forgiving longer travel bikes.

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Posted : 03/03/2016 8:50 am
Captain Mainwaring
(@captain-mainwaring)
Noble Member

@Mikeep wrote:

I think the 160mm enduro bike certainly has its place and for me that's in an enduro race especially, as Trauty has mentioned, manufacturers are releasing bikes with aggressive geometry and less travel. The 160mm travel and slack geo allows you to tackle steep/gnarly stuff and high speeds.

I demo'd a 5010 v2 recently and was amazed how capable a bike it was but at the same time, was great fun on less gnarly trails/red routes. It seams to be the goldilocks formula at the moment and I feel it works very well. You can still ride steep and gnarly terrain, just not at the same pace as the more forgiving longer travel bikes.

I know one seriously good sponsored rider who has recently built a 5010 with Fox 36 forks limited to 140mm travel. Knowing the way he rides, he will be hitting mega gnarly at warp speed. Thing is, what he can do on a 140/120mm travel bike would take mere mortals a 160mm travel bike to do comfortably

Longer travel bikes these days are so versatile that I don't reckon you pay any real penalty for having 160mm travel, unless you are doing really serious distance XC stuff, race, or never do anything really gnarly. If a 160mm travel bike is what you need for confidence for 10% of your riding, and it doesn't penalise you for the 90%, then why not?

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Posted : 03/03/2016 11:23 am
Mikeep
(@mikeep)
New Member

He was pretty handy on his 29er last year!!

I agree, there is little penalty in terms of efficieny with modern long travel bikes.

For me, it's the matter of feel and fun that you get from a shorter travel more sporty bike.

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Posted : 03/03/2016 12:31 pm
dezzy
(@dezzy)
Noble Member

Interesting responses and different views, thanks guys. Was just curious what other people thought.

To answer the "why not" question on 160mm travel bikes, this doesn't apply to everyone (or even anyone on here) but I do hear some 160mm heavier bike owners moan about them on the climbs so if they're not necessary for descents, why suffer on the climbs? But it depends what you're into of course - if you spend most of your time descending and don't mind the impact on climbing then fair enough. I also do think that a lot of beginners going straight to big travel bikes means it's the bike getting them down the trail, not their skill or line choice. But that'll get us into the whole FS vs. HT debate too, which I don't want to do! 😀

D

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Posted : 03/03/2016 2:23 pm
AndyP
(@andyp)
Reputable Member

@dezzy wrote:

Interesting responses and different views, thanks guys. Was just curious what other people thought.

To answer the "why not" question on 160mm travel bikes, this doesn't apply to everyone (or even anyone on here) but I do hear some 160mm heavier bike owners moan about them on the climbs so if they're not necessary for descents, why suffer on the climbs? But it depends what you're into of course - if you spend most of your time descending and don't mind the impact on climbing then fair enough. I also do think that a lot of beginners going straight to big travel bikes means it's the bike getting them down the trail, not their skill or line choice. But that'll get us into the whole FS vs. HT debate too, which I don't want to do! 😀

D

Possibly depends partly on fitness and body size for how much the additional weight bothers a rider.
I'm pretty tiny, so at 13kg(28.6lbs) my spectral(140mm) is about at the upper limit of what seems a reasonable weight, and even in 'climb' mode, without a full lockout the inefficiency is irritating at times, and for the same money moving to a 160mm bike would only get heavier and more inefficient.

@Trauty: Yep, I was aware of that trend, and hope it continues, as i'm of the camp that slack allows you to ride steep/gnarly, and travel only increases how hard you can hit it. Whyte T129 is a bit of a failed execution (in my opinion), as its still heavy even in the top of the range model.

There will never be one bike to make everyone happy, short-mid travel, light (~11kg/24lbs) and slack will sure come close for the vast majority of riders.
Until we get there, we'll all just have to make best use of the N+1 rule to have as many bikes as we need for the terrain we ride.

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Posted : 03/03/2016 2:49 pm
Trauty
(@trauty)
Noble Member

thinking about it people who owns 3+ years old 120 mm full sussers should totally try offset bushings and/or workscomponents angleset. best performance upgrade .

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Posted : 03/03/2016 5:23 pm
druidh
(@druidh)
Honorable Member

Isn't there a problem in that most 3+ year old bikes will have straight steerers?

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Posted : 03/03/2016 5:44 pm
Trauty
(@trauty)
Noble Member

@druidh wrote:

Isn't there a problem in that most 3+ year old bikes will have straight steerers?

:clap:

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Posted : 03/03/2016 9:41 pm
POAH
 POAH
(@poah)
Reputable Member

@druidh wrote:

Isn't there a problem in that most 3+ year old bikes will have straight steerers?

my 6 year old ghost ASX plus has a tappered head tube - put a works components -1.5 headset on it and it made a difference. would recomend them to anyone with an older bike.

Gone from a 140/150 FS bike to a 160mm HT Dartmoor hornet.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/03/2016 4:01 pm
Trauty
(@trauty)
Noble Member

what brand came originally with tapered headtubes? its true that it was 2011-2012 when bikes were getting taper standard.
there are however many older bikes with straight 1.5 headtube

ReplyQuote
Posted : 05/03/2016 5:34 pm
Chick0
(@chick0)
Estimable Member

Cannondales for a long time have had 1.5 headtubes..

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Posted : 05/03/2016 6:28 pm
JohnMcL7
(@johnmcl7)
Estimable Member

I think the point about how versatile the enduro bikes are without much in the way of penalty is a good one, I don't ride such a bike myself but know plenty who are impressed they can have a bike they enjoy using on everything even if it's not entirely optimal or more than they need.

When I rode the full suspension 29er I did fairly frequently hear the overbiked/don't need skills thing which I can see the reasoning for but I'm not bothered, I ride bikes purely for enjoyment. My current favourite which I did four CX races and three endurance races on last year (having only ever done one CX and one endurance race before) is the rigid fat bike and it's most definitely a sub optimal choice. I assume with my stuff on it the weight will be over 15kg and it gets a bit hard on the joints on longer, faster rides but it's just a huge amount of fun to ride. Plus despite all the weight I think it's taken all the PR's off the 29er both uphill and downhill.

John

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Posted : 06/03/2016 5:04 pm
team womble
(@team-womble)
Estimable Member

Just completed a little investigating and discovered the slackest bike I own is 70deg.
I'm now beginning to wonder if my bum problem is actually being caused by me having my weight that far back the rear tyre is buffing my ring piece on the steeper descents! 😆

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Posted : 06/03/2016 8:43 pm
Phil0271
(@phil0271)
Reputable Member

Is it not the case that its more about want than need? The odd time I go to Glentress I see folk on blinged up long travel full bouncers all over the place. You don't need such a thing to have fun at GT and many of the people riding them could be accused of being 'all the gear no idea types' but people like big expensive shiny toys so will buy them if they can afford them. A bit of marketing hype and peer pressure makes the decision even easier. As long as they are happy then fair do's. Me and my mates might make snidey remarks about folks being victims of marketing and heads signing cheques that arses can't cash etc. but we're just being grumpy old men really....

For me I just got bored with suspension and fed up of its increasing cost and maintenance requirements. On a rigid bike, descents take ages ('cos I'm going much slower) but are much more of a challenge. Plus as per a previous poster they are a good excuse for being crap!

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Posted : 07/03/2016 8:42 pm
Captain Mainwaring
(@captain-mainwaring)
Noble Member

@Phil0271 wrote:

Is it not the case that its more about want than need? The odd time I go to Glentress I see folk on blinged up long travel full bouncers all over the place. You don't need such a thing to have fun at GT and many of the people riding them could be accused of being 'all the gear no idea types' but people like big expensive shiny toys so will buy them if they can afford them. A bit of marketing hype and peer pressure makes the decision even easier. As long as they are happy then fair do's. Me and my mates might make snidey remarks about folks being victims of marketing and heads signing cheques that arses can't cash etc. but we're just being grumpy old men really....

For me I just got bored with suspension and fed up of its increasing cost and maintenance requirements. On a rigid bike, descents take ages ('cos I'm going much slower) but are much more of a challenge. Plus as per a previous poster they are a good excuse for being crap!

I am sure there are those kinds of people at places like Glentress (I have never been) but to be fair probably not everybody fits into that category. If you only have one bike for general duties like me then that''s what you are going to take. It's possible they are going to be riding an Enduro or a Munro the following weekend when a big travel bike will be very appropriate. If someone rides a big expensive bike because they want/need it, can afford it and enjoy riding it then fair do's. If they ride one to look flash they deserve everything they get

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Posted : 08/03/2016 11:49 am
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