Are Fatbikes on the...
 

Are Fatbikes on the decline??  

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Fadgadget
(@fadgadget)
Famed Member

Four of my mates have recently sold their Fatbikes after just over a years use and i see many more selling theirs on forums and "For sale collums" . Is the latest 27+ bikes slowly squeezing the Fatbike out??? . I appreciate Druidh and the Captain (amongst others) Have the terrain and the Winter conditions to exploit these bikes but it seems to me that for some riders riding everyday trails Fatbikes just don't cut it and are tiring of them. Any thoughts??

Quote
Posted : 26/03/2016 12:05 pm
Captain Mainwaring
(@captain-mainwaring)
Noble Member

I don't know what people generally expect from fatbike. I bought mine for two reasons
1) I wanted to go out and ride in the snow
2) Wanted something simpler and easier to maintain than the full suss for full on winter mud riding. Because of a bad back I cannot ride a hardtail, but proper fatbike tyres have enough bump absorption to sort that out

The fatbike is a kind of halfway house between a full suss and a rigid so you could either view it as the best of worth worlds, or a rather flawed compromise. Depends on your perspective and what you ride

If people are selling them after a year, what are they not delivering that the owners thought they would?

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Posted : 26/03/2016 1:57 pm
AndyP
(@andyp)
Reputable Member

Possibly people upgrading to nicer fatbikes? Or people that just impulse buy without really thinking why they want one?

I live near a beach, so I have the terrain to ride one on, but didn't go for one yet as I think 27+ or 29 are just going to be better for 95% of riding.

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Posted : 26/03/2016 2:36 pm
Fadgadget
(@fadgadget)
Famed Member

@Captain Mainwaring wrote:

I don't know what people generally expect from fatbike. I bought mine for two reasons
1) I wanted to go out and ride in the snow
2) Wanted something simpler and easier to maintain than the full suss for full on winter mud riding. Because of a bad back I cannot ride a hardtail, but proper fatbike tyres have enough bump absorption to sort that out

The fatbike is a kind of halfway house between a full suss and a rigid so you could either view it as the best of worth worlds, or a rather flawed compromise. Depends on your perspective and what you ride

If people are selling them after a year, what are they not delivering that the owners thought they would?

Complaints of sore arms/Tennis elbow with the rigid forks and the back tyres slipping rather than digging in on steep damp downhill sections. In a few cases it was just the novelty value and these were used as their only bikes.
Two pals went back to full suss to cover more miles faster.

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Posted : 26/03/2016 3:06 pm
Geebs
(@geebs)
Reputable Member

Just had a mate on the phone saying he's just bought one. My first thoughts were "what the f..." But he reckons it's the dogs danglies. A lot lighter than his full suss apparently, and he says he's climbing a lot easier. Suspect the novelty might wear off mind, like a young lad I know who also got shot of his. Not much call for a fatbike in Fife. Gloop is gloop wherever you go, and we hardly get much snow???

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/03/2016 4:05 pm
JohnMcL7
(@johnmcl7)
Estimable Member

The fat bike market is much larger than it used to be now that most mainstream brands have one or more fat bikes so you're going to see a lot more of them for sale as they're not the smaller niche they used to be. I was quite amused at this year's Puffer that it was much harder to find my fat bike team compared to last year when most of the fat bikes were from our team. If I went by what my mates were selling then I'd assume every bike type is on the decline as people regularly change bikes to something else.

I see fat bikes as one segment as the market which like all others bring advantages and disadvantages although still a bit more specialist. I think anyone buying a fat bike as a general trails bike is going to be disappointed with the bike as it's not what they're good for if traction is reasonably good as you're taking the rolling resistance penalty without the benefits. On surfaces where grip isn't so good they are fantastic be it snow, sand or just wet muddy trails. I bought mine for winter riding on natural trails which it's been great for, being able to power along tracks that are bringing other bikes to a halt means it's a lot of fun. It's been a lot better than I expected as stuff I didn't like riding down on the FS 29er I actually have fun with on the fat bike, it just crashes over roots and mud with ease to the degree I haven't ridden the FS 29er since and taken my fatbike endurance and CX racing. Despite the weight and rolling penalties over the FS 29er, the fat bike has been quicker for me even on decent surfaces which has made me rethink how I consider weight.

Unsurprisingly it's not great for trail centres as there's not much benefit from the big tyres and the rigid can be a bit punishing on fast, hard and bumpy sections so I've bought the Stache for that sort of riding. I can easily see a fat bike as being unsuitable for other types of riding but mountain bikes are always about finding the most suitable option.

John

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Posted : 26/03/2016 4:09 pm
Captain Mainwaring
(@captain-mainwaring)
Noble Member

Complaints of sore arms/Tennis elbow with the rigid forks and the back tyres slipping rather than digging in on steep damp dowhhill sections.

I can't say I experienced either of those. Possibly they did not drop the pressures enough to allow the tyres to flex? After a lot of experimenting I was running 7.5F/8.5R. A lot of fatbike tyres are designed for snow and sand with very widely spaced nobs so if they had those then not surprised the wet grip was crap

think anyone buying a fat bike as a general trails bike is going to be disappointed with the bike as it's not what they're good for if traction is reasonably good as you're taking the rolling resistance penalty without the benefits. On surfaces where grip isn't so good they are fantastic be it snow, sand or just wet muddy trails. I bought mine for winter riding on natural trails which it's been great for, being able to power along tracks that are bringing other bikes to a halt means it's a lot of fun. I

Agreed, despite what Sanny said in his STW review

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/03/2016 6:24 pm
druidh
(@druidh)
Honorable Member

First of all - I'm seeing loads of them around. Might be helped by where I live of course but they are A LOT more common than they used to be.

Secondly - there's a lot of "upgrading" going on. Folk who were early adopters have seen a whole new style of fatbike emerge - one which is more suited to UK conditions and usage than the early "Alaska snow-mobile trail" versions (luckily enough, my 9zero7 has pretty modern angles).

But, this

That's a graph I used to use when I was doing IT (hence Gartner) but it pretty well reflects a lot of technological innovations, including bikes. I'd say that there's a fair few folk now at stage 3 :winker:

B+ is something else again. I reckon it has much more relevance for the majority of riders - though still not all.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/03/2016 7:28 pm
Specialayes
(@specialayes)
Estimable Member

I sold mine after 6 months.Was good for a bit but guess it was just a fad

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Posted : 26/03/2016 7:47 pm
Weegi
(@weegi)
Reputable Member

Well I don't think they are in decline at all, I've used nothing but my fat bike since October and a number of riders I know have since bought fat bikes so I guess it evens itself out.

Lots more options these days and yes, the plus size does satisfy many folks needs but it's early days for that size too.

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Posted : 27/03/2016 10:22 pm
Phil0271
(@phil0271)
Reputable Member

I guess that the thing that Fat bikes are good at - boldly going where no one in their right mind would normally go - doesn't appeal to a huge number of people so most will be getting bought because people fancy a change or because fatbikes look like (and are) a laugh. Plus I suspect a lot will get bought by people fed up with the increasing complexity and expense of suspension wanting something simple but isn't quite as brutal as a rigid 29er.

Re rolling resistance - use Jumbo Jims!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/03/2016 7:27 pm
boristhespie
(@boristhespie)
New Member

Tennis elbow due to rigid forks. Wtf? Everheard of bending your elbows. I was brought up on full rigid. In fact I still ride full rigid and yes far more un yielding but never got tennis elbow. Ever.

Sent from my SM-T810 using Tapatalk

ReplyQuote
Posted : 29/03/2016 7:44 am
Fadgadget
(@fadgadget)
Famed Member

Steering on a Fattie is somewhat different to a normal rigid.

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Posted : 29/03/2016 9:25 am
paul
 paul
(@paul)
Reputable Member

dont know about the fatbikes but a few weeks ago i was in halfords in ayr and was told there was talk about doing away with the 29inch bikes, saying it might just have been a fad, i know it was halfords but some of there workers know what they are talking about lol

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Posted : 29/03/2016 11:41 am
Fadgadget
(@fadgadget)
Famed Member

@paul wrote:

dont know about the fatbikes but a few weeks ago i was in halfords in ayr and was told there was talk about doing away with the 29inch bikes, saying it might just have been a fad, i know it was halfords but some of there workers know what they are talking about lol

Oh no I'm now doomed and unfashionable running two 29ers due to those knowledgeable guys at Halfords.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 29/03/2016 12:28 pm
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